Monday, January 14, 2008

Getting fleeced

If you've been reading my blog, (what few posts I have written), I'm sure you've heard about the Icelandic ewe I adopted for a year. Her name is Chloe. During the course of the year, you get these great little quarterly newsletters telling you what's going on with the your sheep and the flock, sheep's milk soap, (Icelandics are exceptionally good milkers), and the latest photos of your ewe. My last photo of Chloe showed her after shearing. The grand culmination of the year of adoption, what we've all been waiting for, is the arrival of Chloe's yarn. The yarn was originally supposed to be spun into yarn at the mill where the fleece was processed. In December I found out that the mill no longer spins yarn in lots of less than 10 lbs. I was offered either the processed roving that I would then have to find someone to spin for me, and a small refund for the difference, OR, the shepherdess offered to hand spin it into yarn herself. I thought, "What could be better than this!?" "She has sheep." "She has a wheel." "She must know what she is doing." I requested a worsted, loosely spun, single, similar to Lopi Lite. When I first opened the box on Saturday, I was immediately taken by the beauty and softness of the yarn. It's a beautiful light grey with darker grey heathering. It is SO much softer than the commercial lopi yarns I am used to. The only problem is the weight. It is VERY thick. Much too thick for the Aran V-neck pullover I was planning to use it for. It's more like a bulky or chunky. It's about the same thickness and loft of Rowan's Big Wool. Here's a picture. Those are US size 13 needles.



I've talked to some spinners, and found out that it can't be un-spun and re-spun in a thinner weight. I have no idea what I'm going to do with it. I live in Hotlanta. There are about 3 days out of the year when I can wear something that heavy. I don't even like knitting with big thick yarn and needles. It's just a big let down, after waiting a year, and ending up with something you can't use. (and it wasn't cheap either) I almost wish I had gotten the roving and then paid someone locally to spin it for me. Oh well, too late now. Live and learn. I guess I can always move to Alaska!

On a lighter note, I have finished my first project for the Ravely group Mission: Possible 2008! It is my LSU scarf, originally intended as a Christmas gift. (didn't quite make it, did I?) I'm sure it will be appreciated, even though they have already played their bowl game against Ohio State. (LSU won)

4 comments:

Mouse said...

Too bad it isn't what you wanted.. it IS gorgeous yarn though! *smooshes yarn* Maybe you can put it up for sale somewhere where folks in colder climates would see it to purchase it?

Claudia said...

YAY for LSU and the first FO for MP2008! Very cool! How about knitting a beautiful lap blanket for Beth with the handspun? I bet that would be a wonderful use for the yarn. I could give you US 13s with a 60 inch cable, wink, wink, nudge, nudge. If I were you, I don't know if I could part with that beautiful yarn tho'.

Joanne said...

I think that some yarns are just meant to be put into a decorative bowl or basket and admired. Perhaps that might be the best choice for Chloe.

Beautiful job on the LSU scarf!

The Yarn Doctor said...

Even thought the yarn is not what you expected, it is really nice and you will figure out something really cool to use it for I bet. Hooray for your first project done for MP2008...only 11 more to go...